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Megan Thee Stallion Pens A Powerful Op-Ed, ‘Why I Speak Up For Black Women’

Today, Tory Lanez is scheduled to appear in court after being charged with shooting Megan Thee Stallion. Perhaps not coincidentally, Meg published a New York Times op-ed titled “Why I Speak Up for Black Women” today, in which she addresses the shooting and uses it as a starting point to discuss violence against Black women.

She begins the piece:

“In the weeks leading up to the election, Black women are expected once again to deliver victory for Democratic candidates. We have gone from being unable to vote legally to a highly courted voting bloc — all in little more than a century.

Despite this and despite the way so many have embraced messages about racial justice this year, Black women are still constantly disrespected and disregarded in so many areas of life.

I was recently the victim of an act of violence by a man. After a party, I was shot twice as I walked away from him. We were not in a relationship. Truthfully, I was shocked that I ended up in that place.

My initial silence about what happened was out of fear for myself and my friends. Even as a victim, I have been met with skepticism and judgment. The way people have publicly questioned and debated whether I played a role in my own violent assault proves that my fears about discussing what happened were, unfortunately, warranted.

After a lot of self-reflection on that incident, I’ve realized that violence against women is not always connected to being in a relationship. Instead, it happens because too many men treat all women as objects, which helps them to justify inflicting abuse against us when we choose to exercise our own free will.”

She goes on to express her hopes for Kamala Harris’ vice presidential candidacy, concluding the op-ed:

“Walking the path paved by such legends as Shirley Chisholm, Loretta Lynch, U.S. Representative Maxine Waters and the first Black woman to be elected to the U.S. Senate, Carol Moseley Braun, my hope is that Kamala Harris’s candidacy for vice president will usher in an era where Black women in 2020 are no longer ‘making history’ for achieving things that should have been accomplished decades ago.

But that will take time, and Black women are not na├»ve. We know that after the last ballot is cast and the vote is tallied, we are likely to go back to fighting for ourselves. Because at least for now, that’s all we have.”

She says plenty more between those two points, so read the full op-ed here.